Happy Independence Day!

Tchaikovsky probably didn’t envision, um, this?
(Hat tip: Scissorhead Moeman)

Tiger Beat on the Potomac (thanks Charlie!) morning email thingie breathlessly tells us that T 1812 Overature is out! Out! OUT! —

Cancel culture comes for a July Fourth staple that happens to be pro-Russian:

“With its earsplitting rounds of cannon fire and triumphal spirit, [PYOTR ILYICH] TCHAIKOVSKY’s “1812 Overture” has been a staple of Fourth of July festivities across the United States for decades, serving as a rousing prelude to glittering displays of fireworks.

“But this year many ensembles, concerned about the overture’s history as a celebration of the Russian military — Tchaikovsky wrote it to commemorate the rout of Napoleon’s army in Moscow in the winter of 1812 — are reconsidering the work because of the war in Ukraine.

“Some groups have decided to skip it, arguing that its bellicose themes would be offensive during wartime. Others, eager to show solidarity with Ukraine, have added renditions of the Ukrainian national anthem to their programs to counter the overture’s exaltation of czarist Russia. Still others are reworking it, in one case by adding calls for peace.” (NYT)

Gonna guess that Possum Hollar is going to go in heavy for this as a tribute to heartthrobs Hair Füror and Vlad. Expect stiffies from the gundamentalists when the cannons go boom.

This entry was posted in Ammosexuals, Gundamentalists, Guns! Guns! Guns!, Independence Day. Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to Happy Independence Day!

  1. gmccammon5 says:

    Big peeners comin’ outta big peeners – what could be more American?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Martin Pollard says:

    I realize I’m dating myself here, but the first time I ever heard the “1812 Overture” was on the 1981 album Hooked on Classics. I might’ve also heard it on any number of Looney Tunes shorts, but I wouldn’t have known what it was called at the time. 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    • tengrain says:

      Martin –

      Me too!

      I swear to Dawg my musical education came from Warner Brothers. Rites of Spring, William Tell Overature, 1812 Overature… I can practically see Bugs Bunny when I hear them.

      Rgds,

      TG

      Liked by 4 people

    • E.A. Blair says:

      My high school band played it during my freshman year. They had people backstage firing shotguns with blanks as the cannons. I found the most interesting thing about it was that the motif used for that rousing close is based on The Marseillaise, at the time of the 1812 war the official anthem of the French army. I also remember when Quaker Puffed Rice™ and Puffed Wheat™ used the music in their commercials, with the slogan “This is the cereal that’s shot from guns!” (that dates me even worse than your example did you, ’cause that commercial debuted in 1962 – I was five). Quaker took those cereals off the market in 2019, but I’m surprised they haven’t revived the brand so they can run the old commercial to run on Newsmax and Fux News.

      There was one critic who called the 1812 Overture “…very loud and noisy and completely without artistic merit, obviously written without warmth or love.”. That critic was Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

      I do not, however, recall the 1812 being used in any Warner Brothers cartoons, and I’ve seen about 600 of them. You may be thinking of Powerhouse by Raymond Scott. Carl Stalling, who composed or arranged virtually all of the Warner cartoon music between 1936 and 1958, when he retired and was succeeded by Milt Franklyn, was fond of quoting themes from Scott’s work, including pieces with whimsical titles like The Toy Trumpet, In An Eighteenth Century Drawing Room, War Dance for Wooden Indians, Reckless Night on Board an Ocean Liner, Powerhouse, of course, and what might be my favorite title, Dinner Music for a Pack of Hungry Cannibals.

      Liked by 1 person

      • E.A. Blair says:

        P.S.: By international copyright law, the 1812 Overture would not have reached public domain until 1943, and US anti-Soviet paranoia (which started almose immediately after WWII in 1946) kept Russian composers out of favor through the postwar period through the early 1960s, by which time theatrical cartoons were pretty much extinct.

        Like

  3. osirisopto says:

    OT I was grocery shopping today and someone was making an ass of himself s he was escorted out of the store. I quickly identified the shortest route to the back door that would not be line of sight to either of the front doors, customer service station or checkouts just in case he came back fully armed.

    Freedom ain’t what it used to be.

    Liked by 2 people

    • tengrain says:

      Whenever I am anywhere in a crowd, I know scan above us to see where the White Christian Nationalist snipers might be.

      I hate being this paranoid.

      Rgds,

      TG

      Liked by 3 people

      • beckymaenot says:

        Same. Heavy sign. It seems that lately- I can’t be anywhere that I haven’t noticed the emergency exits and quick get outta dodge pathways. Sigh.

        Can you imagine how the kids feel at school? Knowing they are required to be there each day and also knowing we don’t give enough of a fuck about their lives to actually do anything to actually make them safe?

        You think you’re pissed at the boomers? Wait until the school aged kids are grown and we are the oldies left to blame.

        Like

      • beckymaenot says:

        That was supposed to be heavy sigh, not sign.

        Like

  4. My 26 yr old (single) Dad (of 5, at the time) bought his first stereo system in the early to mid ’70’s and brought it home along with 2 albums, the Beach Boys and Tchaikovsky. We lived on the very tip-top of a grand hill overlooking the entire neighborhood down, all the way down to the beach. When he got home with his new purchase(s), he set that taller-than-me stereo system up in our wide-open, double front door, facing the neighbors and put them all on full blast, cranking 1812 Overture at max volume. For months.
    Between that gigantic hi-fi stereo system, the 1812 Overture and his never-ever-tethered beloved St Bernard, he totally terrorized (and dominated) our ‘hood.
    He was the GOAT.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. schmice3 says:

    Tchaikovsky would have loved that picture.

    Like

  6. It’s getting more & more stupid everyday.

    Like

  7. Oneofthebobs says:

    I played cello in the high school orchestra. Any fool can play artillery.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Pingback: It Keeps Happening | Mock Paper Scissors

  9. milordcutter says:

    The locker room humor notwithstanding, I don’t understand the Canadian flag flying at half mast on the Independence Day of the US.

    Like

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