SCOTUS Discovers Social Media, What The Hell Is It?

Opus Dei and SCOTUS Chief Justice John Roberts

To injunct or not to injunct, that is the question.

An injunction is basically a quick and dirty judgment call based on a superficial examination of a case. The SOTUS — by a vote of 5-4— has temporarily blocked enforcement of an obviously unconstitutional law from Texas (America’s Lab for Bad Policy) that seeks to bar major social-media companies from removing political content of just about any kind, and —just to be clear— seemingly was designed to restore Hair Füror to Twitter.

In the majority were Justices:

  • John ’Show Tunes’ Roberts
  • Short timer Stephen Breyer
  • Sonia Sotomayor
  • The Virgin Mayor of Keg City Brett Kavanaugh
  • Coathangers

In the minority were Justices:

  • Ginni, er, Clarence Thomas
  • The Witch Hunter Samuel Alito
  • Elena Kagan
  • Neil Gorsuch

We live in an age of miracles.

The three Republican Justices in the minority all signed a troll, er, statement from The Witch Hunter (an avowed Originalist), saying “What sort of sorcery is this?!”, er, that it is “not at all obvious how our existing precedents, which predate the age of the Internet, should apply to large social media companies.” He would have asked Thomas Jefferson about this, but Tom had his Twitter set to block DMs.

“TL;DR LOL” @_The_T-Jeff-1776 didn’t reply, and then blocked Sammy.

This entry was posted in SCOTUS, Social Media, Texas, America's Lab for Bad Policy, Twitter. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to SCOTUS Discovers Social Media, What The Hell Is It?

  1. purplehead says:

    ¿¿¿Kagan??? What’s her problem?

    Liked by 1 person

    • spotthedog says:

      I wondered too, figured it must be something procedural and it appears so from the link; “Justice Kagan dissented, probably not on grounds of the merits but her views on whether the Supreme Court should be getting involved in these major pending cases on the shadow docket rather than letting them work their way through the courts.”.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. “not at all obvious how our existing precedents, which predate the age of the Internet, should apply to should be completely ignored regarding large social media companies.”

    “Hurr Durr, the First Amendment only applies to hand operated broadsheet presses like Ben Franklin used! “

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Stony Pillow says:

    Hey, is Mock Paper Scissors a common carrier, too? Maybe an uncommon carrier?

    Liked by 1 person

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