Meanwhile, in Arizona

The terrible sand people of the terrible sand kingdom of Arizonastan.

Was this road rage or is another weak-brained resident of Possum Hollar making a legal vehicular manslaughter counter-protest of bike riding destroying his Freedumb in the Terrible Sand Kingdom of Arizonastan

Over the weekend in Floriduh, a news story broke about a driver ramming into a Gay Pride Parade; one person was killed on the scene and others injured. At first it seemed like domestic terrorism as the story broke but later we learned that the perp was a member of the Gay Mens Chorus and he says it was an accident. There was a lot of fast inaccurate takes on Twitter (me included) that this is what happens when DeSantis approved vehicular manslaughter against protestors.

I regret my error.

That said, I don’t know if mowing down six bicyclists race can be anything but deliberate manslaughter.

(H/T Scissorhead M Davis)

This entry was posted in Domestic Terrorism. Bookmark the permalink.

24 Responses to Meanwhile, in Arizona

  1. ming says:

    Straight up murder, not manslaughter.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Old fart did the same thing a few years back at El Tour de Tucson. 87 YO ignored the barrier signs and plowed into a group, killed one injured several others.

    I’m putting my quatloos on “drunk, stupid, and that’s why he ran” rather than deliberate for the Flagstaff guy.

    But this state has LONG looked the other way with regards to bicyclists and pedestrians. A bunch of years ago some teenager (who already had a bunch of moving violations) mowed down a prominent local bicyclist riding up Mt Lemmon. ended up his word versus checks notes dead guy, and the cops believed that the (did I say he was a very experienced rider on this route?) guy on the bike inexplicably swerved out in front of the car, even though the only skid marks on the scene indicated his bike was in the bike lane at the moment of impact.

    Kid was fined $60 for ‘failure to yield’. Sixty bucks. Folks were pretty righteously pissed.

    Liked by 3 people

    • spotthedog says:

      Without any direct knowledge of the incident you described I can pretty much guarantee a very experienced cyclist did not swerve in front of the car. Biking up Mt Lemmon is on my bucket list.

      Liked by 2 people

      • ming says:

        Its a great ride. Get out before the heat.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Sirius Lunacy says:

        I’ve driven to the top of Mt Lemmon. we stopped and hiked at several places and the went to the observatory at the top. I highly recommend it. They have the largest telescope available for public use. It is amazing. But, it gets crazy bone-chilling cold at the top of that mountain at night so take many, many layers.

        Like

      • Bruce388 says:

        I could maybe see riding DOWN Mt. Lemmon.

        Like

    • ming says:

      I’ve been on a couple of closed race courses that were entered by drivers. Intentional aggressive acts that luckily did not get anyone killed. One of those incidents took down and hurt about 20 riders that hit the back end of the car. I’ve also lost a couple of friends that were struck and killed by cars over the years. There were very few consequences for the drivers even thought one driver swerved out of his lane to to mess with my friend and ended up hitting and killing him . My other friend was hit by a trailer driven by a 17-year old doing almost 60 mph in a 30 mph zone.

      Like

      • spotthedog says:

        If I remember correct you are in Colorado (?), if so – kinda the US cycling mecca IMO, some epic legendary rides and I’ve been lucky enough to have experienced a few (Independence Pass, Maroon Bells, Tour of the Moon route). I enjoyed the awesome bike path that runs parallel to I-70 and the Colorado River between Glenwood Springs and Dotsero. Working up the nerve to try Mt Evans climb maybe next year. Pardon me getting a little sidetracked, kinda been hooked on this stuff for many years and envious of anybody who lives in CO.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ming says:

        Yes central mountains. The Tour of the Moon was the first course I raced when I upgraded into the 1-2-Pro pack. Entering the downhill tunnels in a pack at at 45+ mph with sunglasses on was the most horrifying thing I have ever done on a bike. Lights out. You don’t dare touch your brakes or skibble. I definitely had my glasses off my face for the tunnels on the second lap.

        Also – Fun fact (for me anyway). My last race as a Cat 3 was Mount Evans. I won and held that category record for 16 years. It’s the highest finish line in the U.S. at about 14,200′. The previous record holder was Jonthan Vaughters. I’ve raced Mt Evans 6 times, and have always been in under 2 hours. I’ve never place out of the top 5. My claim to fame such as it is.

        Liked by 1 person

      • spotthedog says:

        Ming – holy crap, I feel I am in the presence of cycling greatness and now I’m a bit dumbstruck, thank you!

        Liked by 2 people

      • ming says:

        Spot – Thanks for that. Fast guys are a dime a dozen around here. I was never quite willing to do what it takes to make a real career out of it. It’s hard to hang with the top-fuel guys when you’re burning straight gas. These days I’m happy to get a little respect from the young bucks. That is, before they get serious, and I get dropped.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. spotthedog says:

    I am an avid cyclist and whenever this kind of story crops up I really don’t know what to say that hasn’t been said, its just incredibly tragically sad. I am aware of the risk and I take my chances, always trying to be mindful about when and where I ride. For the most part, drivers who come up behind me cautiously give me space as they pass, or stay back until its safe to pass me, and its possible they have no idea that I noticed their cautiousness or that I greatly appreciated it. I usually try to wave after they’ve passed, hoping they see it in their mirror.

    Liked by 1 person

    • tengrain says:

      When I saw the nutty drivers on the narrow streets in Seattle, I gave up my bike. The passive-aggressive drivers here are unbelievable, and they are pretty open about their contempt for bicyclists. They literally park in the dedicated bike lanes; of course the SDOT does too.

      I thought a little bit about getting an electric bike, just to give myself a fighting chance (and I’ll be honest: the hills here are hella steep), but the saner route is to walk and take public transit.

      Rgds,

      TG

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sirius Lunacy says:

        Petition the city to put in few of these:

        Like

      • Yeah I, commute to work on my bike but I stay the hell off the major roads. Fortunately the streets are wider here (When we moved here from NY, Mrs BDR commented that back there all our two lane roads would be four lane back in NY, and I can attest that’s true) so I don’t run into much traffic, but assuming any other vehicle on the road is actively trying to run me down has saved my butt more than once..

        Liked by 1 person

      • ming says:

        I mostly ride trails these days after a lifetime of being a roadie. Driver carelessness has always been a concern, but over the last 5 or 6 years, road rage and aggressive drivers have been off the charts. It seems like a lot more people are acting out if they think they can get away with it.

        Like

      • purplehead says:

        It can go both ways, in this case, reckless cyclist vs walker. Earlier this year, when I was out walking on a local public trail, a bro with a small butt and lycra racing outfit zoomed by—without warning—on his expensive bike, going 25-30 MPH. This is a paved recreational trail used by walkers, families with young kids and strollers, old people with dogs, bikers, skaters. It extends along both sides of the river, with 10 MPH maximum speed signs posted all over. That cyclist scared the ¢r@p out of me and an older fellow who was poking along with me on his recumbent trike as we went up a slope. We both yelled at that guy to slow down and warn people! As we proceeded up the hill, here came that speeder again, coming downhill toward us, going even faster. We both yelled again to slow down. A few minutes later, he whizzed past us again with no warning, going up the hill. Xrist on a crutch. The fellow with me on the trike muttered some expletives, and then continued on his way. When I got to the top of the hill, I saw the tiny-butted prick ≈150m away at the base of the slope, turning around, and coming in my direction again. I saw what he was doing: Trying to go up and down hills as fast as he could. Note: This NOT a velodrome. Since I had time, I pulled out the trekking pole I carry (to encourage snakes off the trail), and extended it. I was waiting for him. As he streaked passed, I whacked his rear wheel as hard as I could. The bike wobbled and he almost fell off. Surprised him. He turned his head, without stopping, and screamed, “Crazy bitch!” I yelled, “Fü¢king a$$hole! Slow down!”

        Self-centered and careless a$$hole biker, endangering people on the trail. There is no one patrolling for people like that guy. Screw him.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ming says:

        Purplehead – There’s a lot of bad behavior from people on bikes and in cars. It’s not all of us or most of us.

        Like

      • MDavis says:

        Seattle has weird driving standards.
        Four-way stop? Commercial worthy start-stop dance but no one actually goes. I’ve gotten out of a car (someone else driving) to direct traffic just to get things moving – criminy!
        But the signaling -Damn! I remember an interview on the TV machine, commercial driver of a van was saying why he was pulled over at the time of some incident – he got pulled over for not signaling, but – he said – he had to get over or [miss his exit, get stuck at the end of a merge lane with nowhere to go] so he couldn’t signal. Another driver in Seattle would see the signal and rush to get into the very spot he was aiming for. I once watched a guy pulling a trailer up I-5 signaling to get into the exit lane for a mile, drivers kept rushing to get in his way. It was nuts! I finally pulled over behind him in the lane he needed so he could complete his lane change. I think I gave him 100 yards to do it.
        I do miss having buses, though. We don’t have those here.

        Like

      • tengrain says:

        The thing is, M Davis, the Seattle driver will not make eye contact when doing any of this merde. They just stare straight ahead as the force you off the on-ramp and onto the exit-ramp (which happened to me several times). I’ve never seen more asshole-erry on the road than here, not even in Boston.

        My favorite Seattle move that I’ve never seen anywhere else: they will start to yield to the pedestrian, wave them to cross and then blast the horn and flip them off as they blast through the intersection.

        L.A. doesn’t use turn signals either, but those drivers are PROFESSIONAL. As they say there, “I’m not gonna give away my next move!” Somehow it all works there. Not the case here.

        Rgds,

        TG

        Liked by 1 person

      • MDavis says:

        It’s been a while since I’ve been there, at least ten years. I don’t remember the no eye contact thing, but I couldn’t say if it’s changed or if I didn’t notice that at the time.
        That pedestrian thing, I’ve never seen that. That is truly nasty. I have seen pedestrians in Burien expecting to just cross the street without checking and just getting belligerent if traffic didn’t immediately stop for them.
        Can I blame homeschooling? Some of the most aggressive, mouthy assholes I’ve ever met were Seattle area homeschooled guys (always males) who never learned to work or play with others. Allegedly.

        Like

      • MDavis says:

        Also, damn – what a bunch of assholes.

        Like

      • Milwaukee is pretty well respected for our bike infrastructure, and we are working on creating protecting lanes apace.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. vonBeavis says:

    Ay chihuahua, this string certainly got off topic. I was a’gonna mention the correction to the parade incident and TG’s mea culpa as a reason I frequent MPS; breaking news gets fixed by reliable sources quickly, usually within a cycle.

    Damn, I wrote cycle.

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.