Great Signs, Cont.

(H/T Secret Scissorhead @NamelessCynic on the electric Tweeter)
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16 Responses to Great Signs, Cont.

  1. donnah says:

    I love dark humor.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Dennis Cole says:

    What kind of store would buy my dead granny’s clothes? And why? I’m missing something here.

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    • MDavis says:

      It appears to be a thrift store for more upscale clothing. It’s the sort of place I used to not frequent because it was too high tone for me when I was hitting up the rich and varied thrift stores in the Seattle Metro area, including the Goodwill flagship store.

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      • MDavis says:

        (Pro-tip: They are displaying shoes. NEVER buy thrift store shoes unless you have a use for them that does not involve actually wearing them.

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      • Dennis Cole says:

        It’s just that I find the idea of wearing a dead person’s clothing so repulsive, I can’t imagine there being a store devoted to that. It’s why I only shop for electronics ($300 computer speakers for $15,) and oddities, or knick-knacks for b’day presents, at thrift stores.

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      • MDavis says:

        Confession – I never thought of it as being dead people’s clothes. I always thought of it as being clothes that were outgrown or clothes that outgrew their closets. So thanks for that perspective, DC.
        I used to shop for cloth, yarn, and books. For a while I did shop for clothes as I was transitioning from a truly crap job (learned a lot, though) to one that required respectable cloths. I didn’t see any other choice than thrift stores for my first office wardrobe. Now I know I was wearing dead people’s clothes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dennis Cole says:

        MD – Thrift shops depend mainly on donations of clothing, household goods, etc.; it’s more a function of consignment shops to buy “gently-used clothes.” But a person’s Chi will imbue their clothing forever after it’s been discarded, and the longer they were worn, the more is “absorbed,” and thus it affects whoever wears them afterward. And I’ve noticed I don’t feel that effect nearly as much with synthetic fabrics as with natural ones, like cotton.

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      • MDavis says:

        I was partial to silk (even the cheap kind) and linen, although rayon put on a surprisingly good imitation of linen.
        I didn’t notice the chi, although mine was messed up during the years I had access to thrift stores. So it might have been like picking out a gentle breeze during a gale.

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      • Dennis Cole says:

        MD – did you ever admire a blouse or sweater a friend had, or some other article, and asked to borrow it? And then when you wore it, you felt kind of a letdown, because it didn’t do all you thought it would do for you? Or maybe you felt marvelous, even giddy or exhilarated? Those feelings could have been a reflection of any strong emotions or experiences that person underwent while wearing that item, and without even being aware of it, it somehow affected you, by YOU wearing their clothing.

        And I’m SO glad I can discuss this with you without being ridiculed. Thee’s more going on in this world than our limited senses allow us to experience, and there are forms of Energy that can’t be measured with the instruments we use.

        Liked by 1 person

      • MDavis says:

        I don’t actually borrow clothes, but there was this one oversized sweater that gave me a really nice feeling to wear.
        And I could tell you stories that involve feathers and plants and child molesters…. er, fish.
        I remember when I tried a test suggested in a book called “Soul [something]” to look for something and see how much you find. Just keep an awareness that you’re expecting to find it, sort of. Well, I did a lot of washing in laundromats, so quarters was a natural choice. And suddenly they were everywhere. A lot of people must have forgotten their quarters in change machines and on counters or dropped them that month.
        I can’t say that I came to the conclusion offered, but it was food for thought.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Weird Dave says:

    The good side of TTSKoA.

    Now here https://www.nydailynews.com/coronavirus/ny-coronavirus-woman-trash-face-mask-display-target-store-arizona-20200706-uckcggzegjexfgu5ozq4yhjmuu-story.html is a far too typical Arizona Karen (and my apologies and sincere sympathies to all the good Karens out there).

    Be sure to watch the arrest clip. By far the best part…

    Liked by 1 person

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