Is It Infrastructure Week Already?

Building Trump’s Wall

Yes, the wall blew over in the wind.

“The name goes on before the quality goes in,” Prznint Jenga didn’t bellow.

Well, back to the drawing board. I wonder if the moat with alligators and whatnot is still being discussed, but on the bright side at least the drug smugglers won’t need to waste time with the readily available jig saws: just blow on it.

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21 Responses to Is It Infrastructure Week Already?

  1. donnah says:

    It will a lot easier to throw bags of drugs over that wall now.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Big Bad Bald Bastard says:

    They call the wind Antifa…

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Big Bad Bald Bastard says:

    I’d love to know who got millions of dollars for this bargain basement wall.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Dennis Cole says:

    The fallen length of wall was about 130 feet long.

    Agent Carlos Pitones of the Customs and Border Protection sector in El Centro, California, told CNN that the wall was newly installed and had been set in concrete that had not yet hardened.

    According to CNN, the National Weather Service recorded wind gusts up to 37 mph when the wall fell down.

    Now, having worked all kinds of construction, I can tell you that when erecting anything that projects upward and may be susceptible to wind gusts HAS to be well-braced in order to protect against lateral movement under “live-load” conditions. Which means you take the weather into account, including forecasts of possible high winds, to ensure your proud member, er, effort remains upright, especially when set in fresh concrete.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Stony Pillow says:

    “The quality goes in before the name falls off,” Prznint Jenga didn’t bellow

    Fixed it fer ya.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. retiredeng says:

    According to the presiding genius wind ain’t strong enough to generate power efficiently. Look, if you put up a huge sail made of whatever it’s gonna take a load. Apparently, the wind that knocked this “wall” over was barely gale force.

    Like

    • Dennis Cole says:

      Apparently, the definition of GF winds differs from expert to expert, but are generally considered to be from 39 mph up to 50+ mph, in which case they’re designated as “Storm Force.” I don’t know why I’m telling a retired engineer this, I’m certain you already knew that, and I’m sure not trying to correct you.

      Asked in Meteorology and Weather, Physics, Wind Power
      What is difference between gale force winds and storm force winds?
      User Avatar
      Gale force winds start at 35 knots (about 39 mph) while storm force winds start at 50 knots (about 58 mph).

      And these “Force Winds” are typically measured in knots, which tend to confuse us landlubbers.

      Like

  7. Pyed says:

    “Then I’ll huff and I’ll puff and blow your erection into a detumescent heap.”

    Like

  8. julesmomcat says:

    “Hey, Suckface – it’s not nice to fuck with Mother Nature!”

    Like

  9. roket says:

    Any evangelicals out there calling this the work of GOD!1!?? I didn’t think so.

    Liked by 1 person

    • MDavis says:

      I’m kinda wishing I had an evangelical license for such occasions. There are bound to be more of them coming along.

      Like

      • Dennis Cole says:

        MD – you can become an ordained minister for either the Unitarians or the Pastafarians right over the Interwebz! I’m sure there are bound to be other denominations that do so, but it would be so totally cool to have an official-looking “funeral service” at the site of the collapse, with a minister, and mourners, maybe some N’awlins Preservation Hall Jazz-type feel-good funeral music.

        Like

      • MDavis says:

        The Wikipedia definition of Unitarianism strikes me as misguided. God is one person? Naw, unless that one person is Gaia or a sort of universe wide Gaia.
        Pastafarianism was ruled not a “real religion” by U.S. Federal Courts, so that has the added advantage (or drawback, take your pick) of adding religious AND irreligious persecution to any declaration of god’s will.
        Hmm, much to think about you have given me. Hmmm. Yes, yes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dennis Cole says:

        “Yes, mm-hmm.” That sounds like the wise old Indian in the “Longmire” series, mm-hmm, indeed. Unless it’s Yoda you’re channeling; either way, good job!

        Liked by 1 person

      • MDavis says:

        Longmire? I know of no Longmire.

        Like

      • Dennis Cole says:

        MD –
        Longmire is an American modern Western crime drama television series that premiered on June 3, 2012 on the A&E network.[1] The series, developed by John Coveny and Hunt Baldwin, is based on the Walt Longmire Mysteries series of novels by the best-selling author Craig Johnson.[2] The show centers on Walt Longmire, a sheriff in fictional Absaroka County, Wyoming. He is assisted by staff, friends, including a Cheyenne man, and his daughter, a lawyer, in investigating major crimes within his jurisdiction.

        The “Wise Old Indian Man” did not feature prominently in the TV series, and only appeared sporadically in the novels, but when he did, his words were pearls of wisdom. I read the entire series of books beginning about 20 yrs ago or so, and the TV series adhered to the content of the novels rather well, since the author was present for everything from script consulting to shot layouts, to the actors who portrayed his characters. It was well-made, and highly-acclaimed, and I enjoyed it thoroughly.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Osirisopto says:

    Y’know, someones gonna havevtompsybforvthat.

    Like

  11. osirisopto says:

    Y’ know someone is going to have to pay for that.

    Like

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