‘He’s Our O.J.’

Meanwhile, at the White House

Yes, it’s another article with some coastal elite journalist from our failed political press going deep into Possum Hollar to write a Margaret Mead-like analysis of what the mysterious, everyday, backwoods  Republican does. Some color from their local habitat, maybe visit a diner to see what these shy specimens eat and then ask them what they think, because individual members of a cult might have something to add to the convo.

Sure. Why not?

This bit in Politico is unbelievable:

“For Keith Swartz, who is 66 years old and runs a recruiting firm based in Tacoma, Washington, almost anything includes a president he regards as “manic, uneducated, illogical,” and also “essentially a horrible person … vulgar, amoral, narcissistic.”

(And yes, I know Tacoma is just down the road from Seattle.)

“Wait, this a defense of Trump? Yes, hang on. He’s done a fine job on the economy, in particular, in the face of a Democratic opposition that has bent rules and abused process for three years in an implacable bid to thwart him. “To those of us who support what he has accomplished,” Swartz concluded, “it feels like he is our O.J.””

‘Tis a mystery why journalists never interview the Left —who arguably have lost all hope for the country, our futures, and now the rule of law— since the 2016 Goat Rodeo was stolen by Possum Hollar’s use of the Electoral College.

This entry was posted in Comrade Preznint Stupid, The Russian Usurper, Death of the Media, ITMFA, Tiger Beat in the Potomac. Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to ‘He’s Our O.J.’

  1. Steve-O says:

    Ah… the cletus safari. The gift that keeps giving… me reasons to drink and hate my neighbors.
    Seriously, has anyone learned ANYTHING from any of these interviews other than the power of low information voters?

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Dennis Cole says:

    An apt comparison

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Karla says:

    Never before have I heard anyone suggest that “he’s our O.J.” would be a compliment.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. “To those of us who support what he has accomplished,” Swartz concluded, “it feels like he is our O.J.”

    Eiron says “fuck it!” and goes off to get alcohol-induced-coma drunk.

    Liked by 6 people

  5. R White says:

    Well, since the stenographers within the worthless beltway media have all normalized the shitshow in DC, excursions for ‘truth’ beyond the Acela corridor are like trips to see the live ape exhibits at the local zoo.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Scottie says:

    Hello TG. I keep hearing the refrain about how great the economy is due to tRump. For who? The stock market is doing great, but it did better under Obama, but that is not an indicator of the economy. For most people their wages have not increased much if at all, their costs have risen, and their disposable income has shrunk. That is not something I feel thankful for. I wish we all could stop using that Republican talking point. Hugs

    Liked by 4 people

    • tengrain says:

      Agreed Scottie. I never use it myself.

      One of the sad rules that the Dept. of Labor uses is when people run out of unemployment, they disappear from being counted in EITHER column. So the numbers of unemployed are always way off. It’s as if the person ceased to exist.

      Rgds,

      TG

      Liked by 3 people

      • Scottie says:

        Hello TG. Sort of a fake until they believe it thing? How deceptive, yet I almost expect nothing less these day. Hugs

        Liked by 3 people

      • It’s been that way since the Clinton administration. That was one of their tricks to make his economy look way better than it was.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dennis Cole says:

        TG – another factor that skews the statistics? The folks who have 2 or even 3 jobs; these are counted separately, with each job counting towards the Employment side,unless they’re part-time jobs in certain categories, which is too convoluted to go into here. And I don’t know how they can distinguish between those still actively looking for work vs. those who have given up, and are either part of the “gig economy,” or the black market, but that’s another piece of the overall picture.

        Isn’t it funny how the Gov’t. can take such a simple endeavor and transform it into cobbled-together-at-the-last-minute rules?

        Like

    • MDavis says:

      I suspect that the wage war between Target and Walmart has done more for the economy that trump’s administration has.
      It’s a theory. Hear me out, it’s not too long, I hope.
      Walmart started it, apparently, but in 2015 they both started raising their starting wages above the lowest amount that the locale of a store would allow. So Walmart and Target starting wage went from the federal $7.25 (or the state or community minimum) to, at first, $9 per hour. (The Wikipedia link calls it the “minimum wage” but I happen to know that Walmart, at least, calls it the “starting wage”.) Those wages started climbing a ladder of wage increases from minimum allowed, to $9 per hour, then to $11 per hour, now over $12 per hour.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Target_Corporation#Labor_relations
      These two companies employ about 1.75 million people, says the google, over 1% of U.S. workers. So increasing their wages puts a lot more disposable income out there, or at least a lot fewer people who have to resort to food banks to keep starvation away.
      Notice the year this started – 2015 – and let’s all remember who was president then. (hint – not trump) The target starting wage is $15 per hour, eventually. (2020 according to the Wikipedia)
      One of the more revolting quirks that came out of this was the Walmart CEO claiming that wage hikes in 2019 were due to trumps tax “reforms” even though those increases had been planned since before they started in 2015 when trump wasn’t even yet a gleam in Putin’s eye.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Scottie says:

        Hello MDavis. Thank you, I did not know this. Yes people having more money to spend is what grows the economy as it creates demand for products and services. Makes sense. Hugs

        Liked by 1 person

      • MDavis says:

        Some rich people understand this. Some even try to explain it to those who appear not to. Those who don’t understand this will eat just fine if they let go of half of their wealth and income, but they just scramble for more. I don’t get it, myself. Once your needs are covered, even if they are expensive “needs” and want, why do you have to have twice as much more? Especially when it is at the expense of people who are scrambling to feed their kids?

        Liked by 2 people

      • Dennis Cole says:

        MDavis – Scientific studies have proven that the accumulation of great wealth stimulates the same “pleasure centers” that cocaine does, and it becomes every bit as addictive. Besides, as well, it often becomes a “contest” or “a challenge,” itself an incentive to acquire and accumulate more and even more, to see who’s the wealthiest.

        It’s why we have lists like the Forbes 500 – we’ve been gradually but certainly propagandized into thinking that great wealth equals great success, and our society is ALWAYS promoting competition instead of cooperation. Look at “Pro Sports” these days: if your team ain’t a winner, you’re a goner, when it comes to coaches and GMs, and you might also notice that NO teams are for sale, and haven’t been for years now. Even a consistently-losing team has immense value, in terms “only the rich” can understand.

        And did you know EVERY pro sports team gets new stadium whenever they get tired of the old one, WITHOUT HAVING TO SPEND A DIME OF THEIR OWN? These gargantuan odes to battling for the Almighty Amero are built using bonds issued by the states, counties or cities involved, and are paid back by taxpayers, when the uber-wealthy owners could easily afford to do so on their own.

        It’s why I no longer follow, or am even interested in Pro Sports – it’s become Big Bizness, and can no longer be considered a ” game,” or even a true sporting event.

        Liked by 2 people

      • MDavis says:

        Money addicts, figures. And tested! No intervention for them!
        And fun fact on sports and their arenas, the Kingdome tear down and replacement was voted down three times and then pushed through anyway. It was actually a wake up for me to news censorship. The demolishers got interviewed and commented on how well built it was, that it would take “half again as much” explosives as estimated.
        (“this baby was built to last”. https://www.seattlepi.com/local/seattle-history/slideshow/Seattle-History-Kingdome-demolition-15216/photo-693453.php )
        The re-broadcast had a voice over saying “half as much”. And that was just state politics.
        I was peeved when Obama appointed Gary Locke to federal posts.
        I was so naive.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Chris Papalia says:

    “it feels like he is our O.J.” – So we all know he’s as guilty as sin, but we’re cheering for him anyway so that we can stick it to ‘The Man’?

    Honestly, this collective Republican fantasy, that somehow they are the persecuted minority, is probably the strangest thing about the rise of fascism in modern America.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Actually, fomenting the perception that “we are under attack by our perfidious enemies everywhere” is one of the prominent hallmarks of rising fascism. (as is another troubling aspect of American society, the grotesque deification of the military.)

      As Upton Sinclair famously never said “When Fascism Comes To America it will be Carrying the Bible and Humping the Flag”

      Liked by 2 people

  8. YellowDog says:

    The secret of Trump’s appeal seems to be that, since he has no principles except his own benefit, his supporters can see in him whatever they want. Keith knows Trump is a full colostomy bag, but he likes what he thinks are the economic benefits. The evangelicals think he is the chosen one–an imperfect vessel put in place by god to punish their enemies (everyone but them). The MAGAt’s like that he pwns the libs with his crude antics and language. It’s “Being There,” except set in Bizarro World. The Republicans are similarly acting in their own self-interest, because they know he will have their heads on pikes, tweeted and primaried into oblivion.

    Liked by 4 people

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