Lunchtime Reading

The sharing economy?

Save this one for your lunchtime reading pleasure:

Keynes was wrong. Gen Z will have it worse.

Instead of never-ending progress, today’s kids face a world on the edge of collapse. What next?

“The founder of macroeconomics predicted that capitalism would last for approximately 450 years. That’s the length of time between 1580, when Queen Elizabeth invested Spanish gold stolen by Francis Drake, and 2030, the year by which John Maynard Keynes assumed humanity would have solved the problem of our needs and moved on to higher concerns.”

The Yutes of Today recognize that capitalism has consumed human and natural resources rather than building a utopia. Much to everyone’s surprise, Keynes’s grandchildren have become Marxists.

No one knows what comes next, but it has to happen pretty soon.  It’s a good read.

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16 Responses to Lunchtime Reading

  1. I read Keynes before I read Samuelson. That made me a socialist.

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  2. To be fair, Keynes was anticipating that humanity would , you know, follow his advice which worked to get the world out of the Great Depression. Keynes grandchildren are marxists for the same reason Keynes was seeing a lot of Marxists back then: capitalism was consuming itself with greed.

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  3. Boadicea says:

    Excellent read. Tick tock… Time’s up, muthaf*ckas.

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  4. MDavis says:

    Maybe I need to figure out how to grow my own tomatoes. We have the sunshine, I just gotta find a way to access more productive soil.

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    • MDavis says:

      Yeah, I’m slated to be one of the starving masses, provided I live that long.

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    • tengrain says:

      You want productive soil?

      Compost, compost, compost. And compost is free. start a Compost heap, and you’ll be amazed how your soil improves.

      Rgds,

      TG

      Liked by 1 person

      • MDavis says:

        I’m still working on that. Two tries so far at this location.
        Also tried putting starter potting soil in a hole but everything just keels over when it hits the native dirt. Full of soda. I can’t even grow celery.
        I can’t even figure out compost.
        I’m slated to be one of the starving masses once the shit really hits the fan.

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  5. Robert Mcneilly says:

    Get help from a Master Gardener.
    Increase soils acid level. Compst compost
    Compost.
    See Bokashi. You can compost dairy,meat and bones

    Liked by 2 people

    • MDavis says:

      I appreciate you and Tengrain offering suggestions, not least because it suggests other people are growing stuff. I do appreciate you. I’m a little overwhelmed right now what with putting serious effort into putting my life into some kind of order and stuff. But the gardens are about number six on my priority list. It’ll probably move up the list as spring gets closer and as I complete other projects.
      I am mystified by my total lack of success with compost. I think if you miss one day watering the whole pile dies or something. I guess a master gardener could help me there, too.
      I saw something about Bokashi a few months ago. The sources I found were out of everything. There was something about doing the whole thing yourself, right down to the starter. I know where to get buckets, I could find a spigot – thanks for reminding me. That one is going back on my open tabs.
      I promise, I’ll be going after compost again, but probably when it warms up just a bit, like above freezing overnight every night.
      And the master gardener thing is good advice.
      But I’ll seriously, no joke, need to container garden. Increasing acid would be major undertaking – we’re less than a mile away from a soda mine. The dirt here is soda all the way down. Every time it rains the stuff perks to the surface. Looks like snow. It’s ridiculous.
      I’ve talked to a couple of people from a local garden club and they learn where I live and say “Oh, never mind, you won’t have any luck there.” A bit discouraging. Although, maybe, #1 I’m spoiled from growing stuff in the Pacific NW where you can almost throw seeds at the ground and do something about the slugs (ducks love slugs and slugs love beer – which dehydrates them without exposing your garden to salt) and do OK, and B they might think I’m just making excuses and don’t want to waste their time on me. I can never tell. So I do appreciate you guys.

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      • tengrain says:

        I was a certified Master Gardener (from California). I try NOT to make this blog about me (ok boomer) as much as I can, to keep it on the issues and the funny.

        Anyway, MDavis, you know how to reach me. Ask away.

        Rgds,

        TG

        Liked by 1 person

      • MDavis says:

        Thanks – you’ll be hearing from me.
        I had two aunts (and I think my grandmother, too, although she was pretty much focused on irises) who were master gardeners and a grandfather who had a couple of acres in a truck farm. All gone now, and I was not able to settle anywhere long enough to learn myself. We did have a couple of really small gardens here and there over the years and I do miss being able to grow stuff.
        We did bring my grapefruit seedlings in to a master gardener “ask you question” thing in western Washington and they told me that grapefruit wouldn’t grow there. I was so confused. “But… but…” (points at seedlings in their pots)…

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      • ming says:

        You might also talk to your county extension agent. Those guys and gals have a wealth of practical knowledge and are awesome. Not to be too simplistic, but it sounds like you live in an area with both both soil pH and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) problems. The white stuff that precipitates at the surface is primarily calcium carbonate (caliche) which forms by evaporation concentration as soil moisture is wicked upward. You will need to seriously amend the soil to overwhelm the pH buffering capacity of the carbonate system, change the SAR, and improve the texture to reduce wicking. It could take a season or more to get it right, but keep adding lots of carbon and nitrogen (i.e. manure, compost, anything that decays). You might also try covering your compost as needed if it is drying out. Small piles take more moisture management than larger piles. Moist but not soaking wet. It also needs to be turned every once in while and shouldn’t stink. Good luck!

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      • MDavis says:

        Thanks. It isn’t for lack of trying a couple of things. We actually had some success in a small no-longer-used irrigation ditch just outside our parking area, but the second planting went totally sour.
        The compost thing, though, I’ve never gotten the hang of although I’d happily help with mom or dad’s compost and have seen it work. Our latest attempt was using a 30-gallon covered plastic bucket with air holes. Added compost starter, watered daily for a while, then every-other-daily until autumn. Looks like it needs more water, but I started to wonder if there is too much Ph in the water stopping the composting process.

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  6. ming says:

    Probably not the pH of the water. Almost all natural waters are buffered in the near neutral to weakly alkaline range (6.5 to 8.3 s.u.) by carbonate reactions (I’m an aqueous geochemist / hydrogeologist). Rain water in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 will have little buffering capacity and should have pH somewhere in the 5.2 to 5.5 range. Bacteria are the real secret and are present everywhere with or without compost starter. You just have to provide the right temperature-moisture-oxygen-environment for them to flourish. Luckily the range is pretty broad. You can’t really kill the little suckers, but they diminish in number and activity if your compost dries out. Just add water again and keep it aerobic. Mature compost generally has a pH between 6 and 8, but during the initial stages of decomposition, a number of organic acids are formed that are favorable for the micro-bugs that breakdown plant matter. The organic material in the pile should have sufficient acid producing potential to overcome whatever buffering capacity is associated with the applied water, but you can always add something like coffee grounds or pine needles to lower the pH of the core and jump start the breakdown. Ms. ming, the dirt witch gets her grounds from the Starbucks at City market and one of the other local coffee houses. Coffee grounds are awesome – acidic with high surface area and moisture content. Pine needles take longer to decompose.

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    • MDavis says:

      Okay, not water Ph, probably.
      We’ve had stuff grow when watering with it, so that is confirmation.
      Now to wait for the dairy down the road to bring more cow poop out. They leave it for locals who want some and I’ll get back on that list. (there isn’t a list)

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