Bad Ads, Cont.

Count yer blessings, you could be feasting on left-overs from Scissorhead Dennis Cole’s thanksgiving… I particularly love the admonition, To be used on poultry only.

You know that there’s a story there, and I bet it’s a good one.

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12 Responses to Bad Ads, Cont.

  1. Bruce388 says:

    Get some Cheese in a Can and a loaf of Wonder bread and you have a feast.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Lsamsa says:

    Oh my…Dupont, the name you can trust to fill you with wonderful chemicals, while it all tastes ‘good'(?).

    Like

  3. purplehead says:

    There was this sad story. I’m sorry the fellow’s product didn’t survive the “private equity” sharks. He seems like a nice and earnest guy, and Batter Blast seemed to work.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. w3ski4me says:

    Isn’t that like the expanding foam I used to reseal cracks in the woodwork when painting? Yummy.
    A side note: expanding foam doesn’t keep out carpenter bees. They chew wood, that foam is like sawdust to them.
    w3ski

    Liked by 1 person

    • MDavis says:

      If you use styrofoam for insulation beware of ants and termites. They apparently love the stuff.
      (We use styrofoam in our windows some winters. Keeps out the drafts and no ants so far.)

      Like

  5. w3ski4me says:

    I wonder what the “cellulose” content of that stuff is? There has got to be a lot of wood fiber in it.
    w3ski

    Like

  6. Big Bad Bald Bastard says:

    Tell your grocer you want stuffing in the can

    Damn, now he thinks I’m into him!

    Like

  7. Dennis Cole says:

    The suggestive shape of the dispenser tip probly led someone, at some time, to think,”Kancho?” And lo, yet another perverted sexual act is born that needs railing against by the Talibangelicals.

    Like

  8. fmbjo says:

    Should we Snopes check this item?

    Like

  9. Mary Ellen Sandahl says:

    I’m just old enuf that I can remember SO much mid-range (i.e. not ritzy) magazine advertising art looking like that. Tells you more about 1950s consumer culture than you probably wanna know … with all those post-WW2 young families really, really wanting to lead Normal Life (no Great Depression, no global war) and having money to spend, and the product development and marketing people falling over each other trying to come up with startling gimmicks to make them stand out in the crowd.

    Liked by 1 person

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