A Stunning Victory for Betsy Devos!

The Tennesseean:

The students at St. Edward Catholic School in Nashville can no longer check out the popular Harry Potter book series from their school’s library.

The seven-book series depicting the magical adventures of a young wizard and his friends was removed from the library because of their content, the Rev. Dan Reehil, a pastor at the Roman Catholic parish school, wrote in an email.

“These books present magic as both good and evil, which is not true, but in fact a clever deception. The curses and spells used in the books are actual curses and spells; which when read by a human being risk conjuring evil spirits into the presence of the person reading the text,” the email states.

OK, maybe it is unfair of me to link this nonsense to Betsy Devos, but it is true that she is trying her best to get kids out of public schools and into religious schools (and she is mosdef sending taxpayer Ameros to private schools in this effort), and this is what they are teaching them: that magic and witchcraft is REAL.

Also: this is book banning.

It’s amazing to me that there is so much enthusiasm to return to pre-Enlightenment beliefs.

(Full disclosure: I’ve never read one word of Harry Potter, nor seen any of the movies. I’m not a child, sadly. But I would defend anyone who wants to read those books and/or watch the movies.)

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24 Responses to A Stunning Victory for Betsy Devos!

  1. Susan says:

    Harry Potter. Not just for children. I am a 60ish scientist. I loved the books and the movies. And, bonus, while it entertains kids, it teaches them the value of honesty, kindness, generosity, loyalty, perseverence,… you know, those shameful, anti-Christian, liberal things.

    Liked by 2 people

    • tengrain says:

      Susan –

      Thanks for setting my sails straight. Not having experienced anything Potter, I don’t know who is the demographic, and did not comprehend that it is for all ages; I figured it was Wizard of Oz-essque.

      Rgds,

      TG

      Like

      • MDavis says:

        Oh, hells no. The last movies actually got too dark for us, as we are not into horror films of any kind. Rowling sets the stage for the final battle of the war by showing the baddies doing bad things to make their leader happy. The leader demands complete loyalty and his favorite side kick likes to torture captives for the heck of it. In the meantime, that group has gained power through infiltrating the (magical community) government and promoting folks who are joyless prigs (also not above torture) and spineless cowards (or the deluded tools) who go along with abuses because it is easier or more profitable than standing up to the bullies – said bullies then morphing into the overlords of the tale as they gradually gain power.
        Any of that sound familiar? I related it to the Nazis overtaking Europe at first.

        Like

  2. R White says:

    It is a distraction based on faux morality where these schools and their leaders are wanting people to ignore that their schools and others like them are leading the way with white flight school district segregation.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/education-news/articles/2019-09-04/school-district-secessions-accelerate-school-segregation

    Liked by 1 person

    • Scottie says:

      Hello R White. Wow I did not know that was going on. How much racist stuff is going on in our country that is not understood or known? How much more racist stuff has been embolden under the current administration? Thank you for the link. Hugs

      Like

      • R White says:

        Unfortunately, fat nixon has emboldened the worst among us to express themselves in such sh*tty ways that if countered, gives those oxygen thieves faux victimhood even though most of us respect the golden rule.

        BTW – my current GF wanted to visit my family in AL for the holiday weekend. There were lots of confederate cockroaches all about whether at the grocery store or out on the lake.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Kent R Fossgreen says:

    It’s worth reading a Harry Potter book just to see how pitifully stupid one has to be to enact this ban. (Also, fun in a junkfood-lit sort of way.)

    Liked by 3 people

    • MDavis says:

      If you do want to read just one, I’d recommend the first one, and not just because of all the world set-up that gets laid out there.
      The first book in the series would have won a Newbery Medal if it weren’t for the “American authors only” restriction. It also has the rather odd distinction of being the one with two titles – in Europe it is called Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, but apparently the publishers figured that the American target audience wouldn’t get that reference, so the name in the U.S. uses “Sorcerer’s Stone” instead.
      It’s also a quick read and Rowling polished this one to get it published. She needed an editor for at least the last two books, but the publishing and movie industry were in a hurry by then.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Dennis Cole says:

    And of course the Law of Unintended Consequences, Reverse Psychology Division, dictates that the kid’s curiosity will be piqued, and so they’ll head down to the local library, which will have to endure a run on requests of both the books and the movies – most of which are quite excellent, btw.

    PS – I believe JK Rowling is the first author in history to earn over One Beelyun Amero$, and then to descend from the billionaire’s club after donating millions and millions to various charities.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. YellowDog says:

    By definition, aren’t Christian beliefs, regardless of sect, pre-Enlightenment? I would use the term “anti-democratic,” or, for the evangelicals who support Stupid, “dominionist.”

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Even some of he most conservative Catholics I know are big HP fans. This is absurd bullshit, all because of a crazy pastor.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. My favorite take on this was Stephen Colbert’s on The Late Show : “If JK Rowling could really cast spells, she could have cast one to make “The Crimes of Grindenwald” a good movie…”

    Liked by 1 person

  8. julesmomcat says:

    Oh, jeez! Pleeez! Let us not return to 1692 Salem, Massachusetts, where my 9th g-grandmother was falsely accused of witchcraft, and died in jail before they could hang her. If these ignorant religious nutcases have their way, that’s where we’ll be headed.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Big Bad Bald Bastard says:

    You don’t have to be a child to enjoy the Harry Potter books, you just need the heart of a child. As a bonus, you can use that kid’s heart to cast some of the spells in the books.

    Joke kinda stolen from Robert Bloch.

    Liked by 4 people

  10. Infidel753 says:

    Well, it’s a Catholic school. Father Moe and Father Lester need to protect the kids from anything inappropriate.

    Look, this is a church that still has exorcists. They believe there are invisible angels and demons everywhere, meddling in human affairs. They believe that mumbling in Latin can transform a cracker into the flesh of a god. It is a profoundly occult, superstitious belief system. Why wouldn’t they believe that reciting pseudo-Latin spells from a novel could actually call up demons?

    Liked by 3 people

  11. roket says:

    Can this possibly be worse than casting aspersions on Louie Gohmert’s asparagus?

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Mary Ellen Sandahl says:

    We can be almost 100% sure that Rev. Reehil has never read a word of the Potter books either. Ms. Rowling took a great big bouquet of supernatural images and ideas – mostly from European folklore – and the basic idea of the British prep school, and wove them into a funny, scary, kid-sympathetic epic about good and evil, with possibly the most splendidly clever plot-and-clue construction in modern English lit.

    Rev. Reehil is getting his cassock in a clump over something that doesn’t exist if he truly, really thinks the HP spells are real. I think his basic problem (aside from not having read a word) is no sense of humor. Example: the HP boggart is Rowling’s take on an old British bogeyman figure, a shapeshifter appearing like the person’s worst fear. The way to get rid of it is to laugh at it by imagining it looking silly, while intoning the sulphurous Medieval Latin incantation “Ridikkulus!”

    Bjue we all know conservatives aren’t funny.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Karla says:

    I’ll chime in to the “not just for kids” chorus.
    My daughter and I started reading HP together when the books were just above her reading level (she was 5 and I was 42). We read the first 4 together, and then when the 5th came out, she was old enough to read it herself. But I read the last 3 by myself, because I enjoyed them.
    And anyone who thinks these spells are real (and can have real effects) is an imbecile.

    Liked by 1 person

    • tengrain says:

      Karla –

      My sister, 8Grain, was an ESL teacher in a disadvantaged school district in California. She loves the Harry Potter books because they got kids were interested in reading. She said anything that encouraged them was fine with her.

      (She also read them with her daughter and said it was a game changer for my niece, too. Also.)

      Rgds,

      TG

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Buttermilk Sky says:

    All religions believe that words have magical powers and must be restricted. They’re right. When used correctly, words make people think, which can be fatal to belief.

    Liked by 1 person

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