Great Graffiti, Cont.

I used to be cool

Yes, due to popular demand (hey, I am too popular!) we have a new category for the last post of the day! Please submit you nominations for snarky, funny, or insightful graffiti to Tengrain AT mockpaperscissors DOT com.

Accept no substitute!

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7 Responses to Great Graffiti, Cont.

  1. Sirius Lunacy says:

    It’s easy to think you’re cool when you live such an insulated life. Then someone comes along, kicks you to the curb and exposes you to the real world. Then you become completely unhinged.

    Like

  2. E.A. Blair says:

    The whole rationale behind removing refrigerator doors when they are disposed of no longer exists. With the old latch-style doors (illegal for 61 years), it was possible for a person to get locked in and be unable to open it from the inside. Wikipedia states:

    “Disposal of discarded refrigerators is regulated, often mandating the removal of doors; children playing hide-and-seek have been asphyxiated while hiding inside discarded refrigerators, particularly older models with latching doors. Since 2 August 1956, under U.S. federal law, refrigerator doors are no longer permitted to latch so they cannot be opened from the inside. Modern units use a magnetic door gasket that holds the door sealed but allows it to be pushed open from the inside. This gasket was invented, developed and manufactured by Max Baermann (1903-1984) of Bergisch Gladbach, Germany.”

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    • tengrain says:

      Mr. Blair –

      Once again, your depth of knowledge astounds me!

      I thought that the hinges were broken and that’s why someone was dumping it. I did not know that there was ever any other kind of fridge!

      Someday, I want to watch Jeopardy! with you. Seriously!

      Rgds,

      TG

      Like

      • MDavis says:

        You didn’t know about the fridge door thing? Man I’m old! I still thought it was common knowledge.

        Like

      • E.A. Blair says:

        I still remember the old latch-door refrigerators; my parents had one, which they replaced in the mid 1960s with a magnetic-door model, which meant that I could open the refrigerator late at night without waking anyone up.

        I have a history with Jeopardy!. In an earlier version of my life (early 1980s), I worked as a designer of video games, and I was in charge of designing the first home computer versions of Jeopardy!, Family Feud and Wheel Of Fortune. Versions were produced for the Apple II, Commodore 64, IBM PC and Coleco Adam computers. For nearly a year, I was totally immersed in the world of game shows. Ultimately, WOF never went into production, the company I worked for went under and the other two games were eventually sold off to another company.

        I was at a toy store in 1986 and saw copies of my Jeopardy! and Family Feud for sale, and another customer asked me if I knew if the games were any good. I told him that I’d spent a lot of time playing them, and if he bought them, I could arrange to have them autographed by the designer. He got them, and when he asked about the autographing, I told him to open the packages up and showed him the names on the design credits. Then I showed him my drivers license and said, “Got a pen?”

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  3. RWW says:

    Many people have died inside refrigerators, believe me. Hillary killed at least a dozen political enemies exactly this way, I can tell you that. I will be the greatest refrigerator repairman ever, and make Mexico pay for it. My best supporters live inside their refrigerators and all seventy-seven billion of the came to my inauguration.

    Like

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